bedwetting-medicine

Bedwetting Is Complicated

Bedwetting is a totally involuntary phenomenon, and it is complicated.  Most professionals’ suggestions for cure are based upon a fundamental misunderstanding of bedwetting.

42 years of successfully treating bedwetting has proven that no amount of restricting fluids before bed or trips to the bathroom in the middle of the night will put an end to bedwetting.  Drug therapy is only a temporary “fix” for someone who wets the bed and usually leads to another failure experience.

No amount of self-talk before bed can reduce the profound distance from any level of consciousness that the bedwetter’s sleep creates.

We are forever grateful when a parent is willing to take the time to write about not only their experience with our bedwetting programs, but the frustrations and misdirection that occurred trying to solve the problem.

This mom wrote to her private counselors here at the Enuresis Treatment Center and asked that her son’s story be shared with other parents searching for help to put a permanent end to bedwetting.

Hi Jasmine,

Peyton is very confidential about his journey with Enuresis.  So I will tell the story.  We have been working actively on trying to stop the bedwetting since Peyton was 4.  Around the age of 5 we went to a Pediatric urologist in the area, which they are supposed to be renowned.  All they suggested was to stop drinking fluids close to bedtime and for him to take Miralax to help him go to the bathroom daily so that wasn’t adding to the issue.  They also suggested a medication that was supposed to help and encourage him along.  With hesitation we started the medication, and Peyton ended up with one of the side effects, getting overheated when he was active.  I just didn’t feel right about the medication in the first place, so I stopped it.

I tried doing the recommendations from the urologist, and nothing was working.  We pretty much struggled with it for another 4  years, as close family would tell me that he will just grow out of it and to be patient.  Be patient, really?  Do they have any idea what it is like to wake up 3-5 times a week in the middle of the night and change the sheets?  He didn’t want to wear the underwear (pull ups) he felt humiliated, so we used the disposable bed pads.  It was both tough on us, because I tried so hard not to get mad, but in the middle of the night, you aren’t always rational.  The worst though is how it affected Peyton, he would pretend that it didn’t bother him, but now and again he would just breakdown and cry and ask me if he will ever be able to get married or go to college?  Completely heartbreaking!  Be patient, as my poor son is slowly entering pre-adolescence and he still wets his bed, his self confidence just crushed.   I pursued another option put together by some psychologist in Israel.  He actually had some beneficial tips, his thing had a mat with tiny electric wires, and an alarm system.  The whole deep sleep component however was missing from his method.  We tried that method over and over for a couple of years.  I was struggling and felt horrible for my son, who was now in 5th grade, and they had a science camp activity.  He was only gone for 3 nights, but he literally had cotton underwear with little pads in them shoved in the bottom of his sleeping bag.  So when he got in at night he would put them on.  Then in the morning he would take them off and if wet, he would just run to the common bathroom and throw them away wrapped in a paper towel.  It turned out he really just dribbled in them and left them in the bag, after 2 nights the smell wasn’t too bad, but by the time he got home I could tell it needed to be changed.   This was so tough for him socially, and he is a happy well-liked kid in school, very active and has lots of friends.

As he entered 6th grade, nothing was working, and I was at my wits end.  I stayed up all night researching something that could help him.  Peyton also was diagnosed by a pediatric neurologist with being “overactive” not ADD or ADHD, but very active.  He also has tics, so he was suggested to take some magnesium and B6, that seemed to calm down the tics.  Poor kid, what more could he have to decrease his self-confidence, but he is always happy on the outside, but I know deep down it really hurt him.

He has always been a VERY DEEP sleeper, very groggy in the am, and lots of mumbling at night.  I found your bedwetting program information through a google search online, and you had actual research to back it, and mentioned the connection with the deep sleep and how helping the individual work on achieving healthy sleeping patterns, how this can help with things like over activity, and possible other neurological things.

It took us less than a year, although after 5 months, he really was having episodes that were VERY infrequent.  What a difference from the wetting every night.  You have helped so much in this whole process, you helped me feel that we aren’t the only ones, and Peyton although he would only talk to me about it, it helped him have more self-confidence.  So far, he has been dry completely for almost 4 months now.

We officially graduated a couple of weeks ago.  We got him a new bed, sheets, and comforter.  He is so happy, and his self confidence is up, the other wonderful thing is, his tics are a lot less noticeable and some days I don’t even see them.  We aren’t taking the supplements for them either, so I truly believe it has had a positive effect on them.  We aren’t on the edge of our seat anymore in the middle of the night if I hear something, and in the morning when I wake up, I am no longer feeling his bed to see if it is wet.   You have changed our lives and have helped my sweet son.  I can’t thank you enough.  At one time I felt like it was going to be a lifelong struggle for my son, and to know that it is no longer part of his life, is priceless.  This is the best program for anyone with Enuresis.  Thank you, thank you and THANK YOU!  What a journey, and the fact that we no longer live with it, is beyond words!

Sincerely and forever grateful,

Melissa M
Saratoga, NY

Author Michael Stallsmith, M.A., Sp. A., Director of Treatment

The Enuresis Treatment Center’s Director of Treatment is also a school psychologist.  Michael Stallsmith has, over the past 20 years, been involved in over 20,000 cases.  He is responsible for overseeing the counselors on our staff who work directly with the patients, and he is effective at implementing what’s needed for any challenging situations that may arise during treatment.

Michael continues his outreach with the medical community and school systems educating them about bedwetting and its relationship to the non-arousable sleep disorder.  Michael has been on staff at the Enuresis Treatment Center since 1982.

Click her to learn about our Critical Factors for Success https://nobedwetting.com/critical-factors-success/

adult bedwetting

Case Study of Adult Bedwetting Patient

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This is a case review of a 42-year-old Caucasian male, who we will refer to as William. He was suffering from bedwetting for his entire life.  Bedwetting is also known as nocturnal enuresis and primary nocturnal enuresis.   William reached out to our clinic after reading about our expertise in solving adult bedwetting.  He commented about his experience of relief while reading our website information, and that it made so much sense.  He then knew unequivocally that his heavy, deep sleep had to be the underlying issue, not only for his years of nighttime accidents, but also for his teenage son’s bedwetting.

Family History of Bedwetting:  

William’s father experienced bedwetting into his teen years.  William’s grandfather also wet the bed as a teenager.  His father’s father experienced teenage bedwetting as well.  Now William’s son continues to experience nighttime bedwetting as a teen.  He has always wet the bed – never been dry at night.

In recent years, William’s father was diagnosed with sleep apnea, and he currently wears a c-pap device, also know as a continuous positive airway pressure therapy, to help regulate breathing.  This is not an uncommon diagnosis stemming from the sleep disorder with which we work.   Also, not uncommon is the sleepwalking and night terrors experienced by his aunt.  These are symptoms that cannot be eliminated.  The only possibility is to manage these symptoms as best as somebody can.  Since bedwetting was “outgrown” by his dad and aunt, the detriment it poses is that these other untreatable conditions can surface and affect quality of life.

We know  a new pattern of sleep is needed which will not only eliminate bedwetting; it will also cut off the possibility that the untreatable conditions will arise.   

Dr. Roger Broughton, a neurologist and foremost sleep researcher from McGill University in Montreal, is an expert upon whose findings have led to our initial protocol.   He highlighted a condition called deep-sleep bedwetting.  The sleep study conducted by Dr. Roger Broughton is titled, “Sleep Disorders: Disorders of Arousal? Enuresis, Somnambulism, and Nightmares Occur in Confusional States of Arousal, not in “Dreaming Sleep.”

The result of this study shows the differences in normal sleep patterns and those of a bedwetter.  In normal sleep, people fall slowly from Stage 1 (lightest sleep) into Stage 4 (deepest sleep), and then back to lighter stages where it’s easy to awaken.  A full cycle takes approximately 90 minutes to achieve.  A person who wets the bed falls quickly into deep sleep and stays there for longer periods.  This is the problem.  The brain is not supposed to stay in Stage Four for very long.  Cycling doesn’t take place consistently throughout the night, and the bedwetting occurs as a result.

The study’s findings concluded that all bedwetters share a deep sleep pattern. Our center has decades of clinical and anecdotal experience, which proves that the only effective treatment and cure for bedwetting is to change the pattern of sleep. Chronic bedwetting is the symptom caused by the inherited sleep disorder. This same sleep disorder causes sleep apnea, excessive snoring, sleepwalking, night terrors, insomnia, and bruxism.

This type of deep, heavy sleep produces a poor-quality sleep rather than a high-quality sleep.  The infographic below illustrates the effects of sleep deprivation:

sleep deprivation

Initial Assessment:

A thorough assessment, required for preparing for one of our programs, revealed  that he also experiences difficulty awakening in the morning, had sleepwalking episodes as a child, and was prescribed Ritalin during his late teen years to help with focusing and hyperactivity.

When we discussed the frequency that the bedwetting is occurring, William claimed he has wet the bed every week of his life.  In the past year he has seen an increase in the frequency of the bedwetting with a pattern of two to three times a week on average.  

Currently he has no medical issues other than seasonal allergies.

He has previously – during childhood and even as a teen – been examined by two pediatricians, three urologists, and a neurologist to determine a cause of the bedwetting, also know as primary nocturnal enuresis.  At no time was a physical symptom diagnosed.  Enuresis workups included:  Urinalysis, urethral obstruction scope, several ultrasounds, and an MRI.  

According to the American Pediatric Association, less than 1% of bedwetting is caused by a physical problem.

He stated that typically the physicians’ focus of bedwetting treatment was placed upon managing the bedwetting rather than a full resolution.  After a failed attempt using a bedwetting alarm, being told to wait and do nothing until puberty when he is likely to stop wetting was the direction his parents were given.   Clearly it turned out to be inaccurate (as it is with most of our patients)

He did not recall a physician providing any statistics regarding the length of time he would suffer from bedwetting, and of course he was not provided the statistics for primary enuresis: 1-30 for teenage bedwetting or 1 -100 adults who would continue wetting the bed as an adult.  

No medications were prescribed until he reached age 24.  Over time, he was placed on three different drugs, which included Ditropan and Tofranil to no avail.  His last desperate attempt was with Desmopressin.  William researched the side effects of Desmopressin when the dosage was increased to three pills each night, and when he started regularly feeling queasy and irritable, which he said was not typical.   William lives in a warm climate, is physically active, and knew how important hydration was to his well-being.   Desmopressin is meant to purposely cause dehydration in the body in an attempt to eliminate the bedwetting.  When his discovered the extensive list of side effects of Desmopressin, as well as the ineffectiveness, he stopped taking the drug immediately.

What makes drug intervention for bedwetting a completely ineffective approach is because it doesn’t remotely touch the causal factor of the core issue – sleep.   

Below is a list of some of the side effects of Desmopressin.  

Source  https://www.rxlist.com/ddavp-side-effects-drug-center.htm

Also known as DDAVP, it is an antidiuretic and anti-hemorrhagic drug used to treat bed-wetting, central cranial diabetes insipidus, and increased thirst and urination caused by head surgery or head trauma. DDAVP is also used to treat bleeding due to platelet dysfunction. DDAVP is available in generic form.

Common side effects of DDAVP include:

Headache, nausea, upset stomach or stomach pain, diarrhea, or flushing of the face (warmth, redness, tingly feeling). DDAVP can infrequently cause low levels of sodium in the blood, which can be serious and possibly life-threatening. Seek immediate medical attention if you have symptoms of low levels of sodium in the blood, including:  loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, severe headache, muscle weakness/spasms/cramps, weight gain, unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, mental/mood changes (confusion, hallucinations, irritability), loss of consciousness, seizures, or slow/shallow breathing.

Physicians continued to tell him he was not trying hard enough, which he confided was scarring his self-esteem, and resigning him to the point of view that he would have to live out his life continuing to wet the bed. He expressed a deep resentment over the dismissal of this problem of wetting the bed, and was amazed and confused that it would even be intimated that he hasn’t done his part to end the stress of this condition.  

We can see more about how the problem with doctors saying bedwetting will be “outgrown” can cause psychological havoc to its victims, attacking self-esteem, increasing a sense of failure, and feeling “different”.   For many of our adult patients, they tend to live more solitary lives because they feel too uncomfortable disclosing the bedwetting to a potential mate.  Unfortunately, intimacy often becomes what they feel is an impossibility to them.   We understand it can be difficult to open up to somebody about this condition.  Many adults in our program have expressed anger or sadness or regret for having “missed out” on opportunities as a result of having to hide an extremely sensitive and often shameful part of their lives.

He was highly motivated to enter as well because his wife had recently filed for divorce.  One of the reasons involved her perspective on William’s bedwetting.  She eventually began to accuse him of deliberately wetting the sheets.   In fact, in a most unfortunate experience for William, his wife used this perspective and had her attorney introduce it publically in divorce court.   We have the utmost respect for William to ride that through, and then do whatever it would take to eliminate a problem that he thought he had no control over, and that has clearly impacted his life to the extent of being publically humiliated.  

Enuresis Treatment Center

Years of research and development dictates a two-week meeting schedule in order  to properly develop a  personalized plan.  We assign to our patients one of our staff counselors to work closely with them and facilitate their plan.  Our counseling staff includes a school psychologist, nurses, and teachers.  William was offered the opportunity to conduct his appointments via Skype.  He chose instead to have phone contact because, as he described, “the pain and embarrassment is too deep to face anyone”.

Our protocol dictates that our Director of Treatment reviews each case before a customized program is designed.  It was determined that a male bedwetting counselor would work with William throughout his program.  

Focus was placed upon ending the heavy and problematic sleep that had caused the continuation of the nocturnal enuresis.   Besides the enuresis, William presented with always feeling unrested, having difficulty focusing, being exhausted upon awakening rather than refreshed, and becoming more and more withdrawn over the years.  

We found out that William had symptoms of urgencies, a need to empty his bladder multiple times during the day, and we know this was attributed to the bedwetting itself.  It was determined that this is an actual a symptom of the bedwetting because the bladder tends to remain underdeveloped as a result of emptying regularly in the night.   We therefore developed and implemented a seriesces of targeted exercise, introduced at varies segments of his program ,develop to needed to fully support him and thus eliminate excessive needs to urinate during the day.   

In week six of our progressive and holistic approach, William began to see a change in his wetting pattern, and he was thrilled.  Of course, he would be!  For the first time in his life, he began to see progressive results leading to an end to the bedwetting.  He told his counselor that he was able to see progress and the finish line was in sight!

What is required for each appointment is pertinent data as it relates to the bladder development and the sleep intervention training.  Incremental changes are often difficult for the patient to detect, but the job of the bedwetting counselor is to identify and design the next step to maintain progress.

Enuresis Treatment Center’s sleep training protocol focuses on the relationship between the deep sleep and the disconnect with the bladder signals.  

As we know, the brain becomes less malleable as we age, and it was known that Williams program would possible take longer than it would take a child’s brain to respond.  

William’s counselor noted that he followed all directives in a timely fashion.  The Reinforcement Phase took longer, as was anticipate, but completed.  His counselor was satisfied, via current data, that his new sleep pattern had emerged.  The bladder and brain synchronized and the adult bedwetting ceased to be a problem.

William entered his teenage son into one of the Enuresis Treatment Center’s specialized teenage bedwetting programs four week after he finished his program.   
Source of graphic:
http://jonlieffmd.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/800px-Effects_of_sleep_deprivation2-300×220.png

Author Michael Stallsmith, M.A., Sp.A.

The Enuresis Treatment Center’s Director of Treatment is also a school psychologist.  Michael Stallsmith has, over the past 20 years, been involved in over 20,000 cases.  He is responsible for overseeing the counselors on our staff who work directly with the patients, and he is effective at implementing what’s needed for any challenging situations that may arise during treatment.

Michael continues his outreach with the medical community and school systems educating them about bedwetting and its relationship to the non-arousable sleep disorder.  Michael has been on staff at the Enuresis Treatment Center since 1982.