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Teen Bed Wetting …Why Would A 13-Year-Old Wet The Bed?

“Don’t worry, they will outgrow it”. Is this something you’ve heard before? How many times has the bedwetting teen heard this?  After years of waiting and being frustrated, people are saying they’ve had enough! This is why we continue to see more teenagers and adults enter our program. They don’t want to wait another year.

Your pediatrician is undoubtedly committed to your child’s health and wellbeing, yet wetting the bed is not a medical condition. So without expertise in the field of bedwetting treatment, doctors are often telling families to wait, and this can come with a price.

There may also be well-meaning family members or friends who suggest to wait. Or perhaps you, yourself, had outgrown bedwetting, and it seemed logical to wait for your child to outgrow it as well.

Yet outgrowing bedwetting is not a certainty. In fact, if it should happen, doing so may be counterproductive to one’s health. More about that in a moment.

We know what bedwetters and their families are experiencing with the day-to-day, week-to-week, month-to-month challenge of waiting…of having to even think about bedwetting. The costly disposable diapers, the wet sheets, the labor to clean the sheets; living with the resignation, guilt, and confusion. This causes stress, of course, and it’s actually unnecessary and can be ended. We imagine you’re feeling relieved to hear that.

We’ve heard hundreds of stories of despair over the years, and we’d like to share one here that highlights the impact of holding on to the hope that bedwetting will be outgrown.

We are focusing on teen bedwetting. Since the average of our patients is 15. So here’s the story about 13-year-old Ben.

Imagine you’re a boy of 13 who is in middle school with lots of friends, and you excel in sports. Your academic, family, and personal life are all going well. Yet you live every day with a secret–one that you have been keeping for most of your life.

There have also been limitations and consequences for you that are hidden from others. Perhaps you’ve had to turn down invitations to sleepovers and avoid camp stays, and your friends began to wonder why. Slowly they stopped inviting you, and your world got smaller and disconnected.

You had reached a point where you pleaded with your mom to stop asking the doctor for bedwetting help during your Well Visit. After all, what’s the point? All you keep hearing is “Wait, Ben…you’ll outgrow it. You will not have to wet the bed for long. One day you’ll just suddenly stop. Can’t say when, though”. Surely it’s discouraging and embarrassing to talk about your bedwetting any further.

In the back of your mind, you must be feeling helpless. Maybe you’re resigned to thinking you’ll have to live with the hardships of bedwetting for the rest of your life.

“Why can’t a doctor fix this”?

Going to bed every night is difficult knowing that when you open your eyes in the morning, you’ll feel the cold, wet bed or diaper, and you may start your day discouraged. We are guessing you’re feeling unrested as well. This is another sign of the sleep disorder at the heart of the bedwetting issue.

Let’s explore that assertion here.

With 42 years as bedwetting specialists, we clearly understand the relationship between a deep, heavy sleep pattern and bedwetting. In fact, our entire process is based on a groundbreaking study that was discovered by our founder, Barbara Moore, in 1976. This was the breakthrough that was needed to stop bed wetting for our founder, Barbara Moore’s daughter, for whom the protocol was developed.

In 1969 when a foremost sleep researcher by the name of Dr. Roger Broughton had identified what he called the non-arousable sleep disorder, he proved the pattern of sleep for a bedwetter is far different from healthy (non-bedwetting) sleep. For the healthy sleeper, the body actually goes through various sleep cycles. We cycle from light to deep (Stage 1 to Stage 4), then enter a lighter stage known as REM (dream sleep), and then we begin all over again. This cycle occurs approximately every 90-120 minutes, and this is what creates restful sleep and ensures the brain is appropriately nourished and responsive.

Such is not the case with the specific pattern of sleep that produces bedwetting. Dr. Broughton spent years studying sleep and validating why bedwetting happens. This is why our approach is based on his findings and why it’s working. It’s based in science. Our program has been highly successful since we have been treating patients from this proven perspective. When a 13-year-old like Ben falls asleep, they drop into a very deep, heavy sleep and stall rather than cycle. He remains in this very hard sleep much longer than is required, and it can rob him of the opportunity for restorative, restful sleep. It’s actually a sleep deficiency. Anytime there’s a deficit in any given situation in life, it has a negative effect. So imagine if someone is experiencing bad sleep every night of their life? Parents of a seven year old cannot image the possibility of their child experiencing teen bedwetting. Yet it’s a real concern, and it gets increasingly more detrimental as time goes on.

For tweens and teens, sleep is even more important. “One possible implication of our study is that if you lose too much sleep during adolescence, especially chronically, there may be lasting consequences in terms of the wiring of the brain,” according to investigator Chiara Cirelli, MD, PhD, associate professor in the department of psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin’s School of Medicine and Public Health. “Adolescence is a sensitive period of development during which the brain changes dramatically. There is a massive remodeling of nerve circuits, with many new synapses formed and then eliminated.”

Let’s take a moment to take a closer look into the stage of REM sleep.

  • REM sleep important to the health of the brain for many reasons, including the creation of long-term memories.
  • REM sleep also increases brain activity, promotes learning, and creates dreams.
  • REM is also attributed to the fact that during this phase of sleep, your brain exercises important neural connections which are key to mental and overall well-being and health.

It’s also imperative for us to mention that not having the normal cycling of sleep stages—not accessing REM sleep regularly throughout the night and thus creating the sleep deficit–can also pose challenges during waking hours, as you can imagine. Waking up wet and tired, a bedwetter faces the day differently. Now they have to go to school and interact, and also be expected to perform to full potential. This can be quite difficult. In fact, many difficulties that a bedwetter faces—including ADD and ADHD—are not often traced back to the sleep disorder by professionals. It’s not a lack of competency; it’s a lack of proper knowledge. Therefore, challenges persist–if not increase—over time. Even if doing well academically, there is the underlying and increasingly challenging sleep issue which expresses itself more obviously over time.

Also worthy of noting: We have seen over the years that as a child continues to wet and becomes more acutely aware of their challenges and feeling “different” or even defeated, they tend to withdraw from social activities that are important to them, but are now feeling too uncomfortable to participate in.

We mentioned that outgrowing bed wetting can be counterproductive to one’s health. That’s because IF somebody happens to outgrow the bedwetting issue, the sleep disorder remains, and other symptoms can emerge over time such as sleep apnea, sleep walking, night terrors, excessive snoring, teeth grinding, etc. There can be unpleasant life-altering consequences to each of these. Changing the pattern of sleep is not only going to stop bedwetting, it’s also going to prevent any other symptoms from developing.

Our experience has shown that once the sleep pattern has been impacted and there’s normal cycling, as Dr. Broughton references, healthy sleep cycling has a chance to take root. You begin to see significant improvements, such as with disposition, focus, concentration, energy expenditure, alertness, connection, etc.

When a patient is free of detrimental sleep and achieving good sleep for the first time in their lives, positive benefits abound. Besides, it’s rewarding to see your child start their day in a dry bed and knowing you made that difference for them. And what an enormous difference they will feel!

Working 42 years as bedwetting specialists, we have helped thousands of children, tweens, teens—and yes, adults–who continue wetting the bed. We find most of our adult patients have led solitary, isolated lives hiding in shame. This is sad and unfortunate considering that nobody has to live with bedwetting. Nobody.

83% of parents of 9-16 year olds tell us that they regret following their physician’s advice to wait. They reported feeling misled and dismissed. You can see the impact that the hoping, wishing, and waiting can have. We are here to ensure that our patients experience the sleep they are born to have—need to have–and the dry bed every morning that they deserve to have.

GaileGaile Nixon,
International Director and First Patient of ETC

Summer Camp Tips For Bedwetting Child or Teen

This is the time of year when we hear from parents about the fear of letting their child attend summer camp.

As for the child, they are torn between terror and excitement.  The excitement is because, of course, it’s summer camp…a time to do nothing but laugh and play.  And then there’s the terror.  That is the most fitting word to use, because we hear and we know that the thing all bedwetters dread the most is being discovered, and they’ll go to great lengths to hide their condition. 

We spoke with a mom last week who thought she had fully prepared her 13-year-old son to attend camp and to completely conceal his bedwetting with the use of Pull-Ups.  Her careful planning was undermined by a member of the camp staff.  She was devastated when she discovered what happened that put her son at risk for exposure.  This mom gave us permission to tell her story with the hope that other parents can avert the kind of experience she had. 

Here is her story.  Following this are the 5 Critical Steps we recommend to ensure you greater peace of mind.  

This mom, (Lydia), and her son, (Bryce), agreed that wearing a diaper was the only way to feel comfortable to sleep in a cabin with other campers.  At her son’s insistence, they purchased all diaper brands and sizes so he could do what he called “test driving” all of them in search of the “quietest” one.  All of this to prevent someone from hearing the sound of moving around in a diaper.  After all, it’s a noticeable sound.  They practiced how he would slide it on once he was in his sleeping bag at night, and how he would discreetly dispose of them in the morning.  Not the most exciting thing to have to add to a care-free camp experience.  

Typically this plan is the most successful.

However, Lydia did not learn until nine months later–as we were discussing a plan to put an end to Bryce’s bedwetting–what occurred during her son’s camp stay.  When he had checked in with the camp director as his mom advised him to do, Bryce was told that they required he use their own chosen disposable diaper for legal reasons, and that they needed to exchange them before he could be admitted.  In our consultation with this family, Lydia discovered that Bryce was afraid to challenge them since they were in charge.  As you can imagine, Bryce was terrified that someone would find out he was wearing a diaper, so he chose not to wear a diaper and stay awake all night to avoid a wet.  He said he was typically exhausted all day, which prevented him from participating in a few enjoyable activities.  He would take a nap wearing the camp-issued diaper because no one was around.  Bryce told us that he didn’t tell his mother that he was miserable because he didn’t want her to be sad.

Summer camps may report to parents that they know how to deal with bed wetting, even bed wetting teens. However, you need to be assured that your child will be protected from potential harm just as with Bryce, so we encourage you to have an in-depth conversation with a director before the day arrives.  

Here are The Five Critical Steps:

1.  Identify not only the director(s) of the camp, but also the person(s) assigned to your child’s cabin.  You need to be assured by them that they will be discreet.  Ask them what their protocol is.  Make sure they can provide special assistance to ensure the bedwetting won’t be discovered.  Discovery is devastating for a bed wetter.  That discovery can certainly cause long-term damage to self-esteem. 

2.   Notify the director that you will be providing your own privacy package which may include the following:  Diapers, non-scented wet wipes, a trash bag, a suitcase with a lock, and whatever else it is you feel would help put your child’s mind at ease.

3.  Ask to review their procedures for dealing with this issue.  You need to become partners on behalf of your child.  Present different scenarios and ask how they would deal with each scenario.  For example, if a camp counselor is unavailable, then who would be able to assist your child during if needed.

4.  Don’t assume a so-called “bedwetting medication” will keep your child dry.  The medication is intended to slow kidney function and limit urine production.   It is NOT reliable and should not be depended upon to ensure dryness.  Even if the drug was used in previous camp stays or overnights and it was successful in keeping your child dry, there is no guarantee it will do they same again. Additionally, the medication has a dehydrating effect on the body and requires extra hydration during the day, so make sure you child has a water bottle available to him when active.  

5.  Daytime accidents are often a symptom from the nighttime bedwetting.  In the event of daytime leaking or accidents, you need to know what the counselors will do if your child reports leaking to them.  Make sure there is a plan for a change of clothing as well. 

Once you have established a clear plan with the camp, review it with your child.  Your child, tween, or bedwetting teen needs to have confidence in their camp team, to know they can be trusted, and that everyone understands the situation and will be there to help.  Let your child know that you’ll be one phone call away.

GaileGaile Nixon,
International Director and First Patient of ETC

The Bedwetting Battle – The Misunderstandings Continue

Dr. Bill Sears in his article, “Battling Bedwetting” makes suggestions to parents regarding dealing with their children’s bedwetting.  Our staff psychologist, Dr. Lyle Danuloff, disputes Dr. Sears’ tips and claims.  Below you will find his perspectives.

Dr. Sears – Dr. Sears instructs parents to have the bedwetter “grunt it out” before bed, i.e. completely empty the bladder as a way to stop the bedwetting.

Dr. Danuloff – Bedwetting does not occur because a bladder does not empty.  It occurs because of the failed brain-bladder connection.  Bedwetters’ bladders are significantly underdeveloped.  Because of this, even a small amount of urine in the bladder can trigger the bladder to empty.  It will empty, no matter the amount of urine in the bladder, because the deep sleeping brain fails to keep it closed.

Dr. Sears – Have a “talk” with the child so they can repeat phrases such as, “I will get up and go to the bathroom when I feel my bladder gets big.  I will splash water on my face to wake up and grunt three times.”

Dr. Danuloff – Dr. Sears’ directive exposes his noticeable failure to understand the impact and power of the deep sleep someone who wets the bed experiences.  Bedwetting is a totally involuntary phenomenon.

No amount of self-talk before bed can reduce the profound distance from any level of consciousness that the bedwetter’s sleep creates.  His suggestions of a “talk” and methods of self-awakening provide evidence of his lack of understanding.

Dr. Sears – The doctor suggests that the above two methods “usually work 90% of the time.”

Dr. Danuloff – Unfortunately, they don’t.  His suggestions for cure are based upon a fundamental misunderstanding of bedwetting.

Dr. Sears – Go “high tech” and use a “bladder conditioning device”, i.e. A pad and buzzer that goes off at the first drop of urine, thus awakening the child.

Dr. Danuloff – Again, Dr. Sears displays his misunderstanding of the profound depth of sleep the bedwetter experiences.  Someone who continues to wet the bed can sleep through thunderstorms, loud music and alarm clocks.  A buzzer or bedwetting alarm, used alone, never awakens someone who wets the bed.

Dr. Sears – Dr. Sears refers to the many “little bedwetters” he has helped.

Dr. Danuloff – Bedwetters come in all ages.  At Enuresis Treatment Center, while we treat children as young as 5 years of age, the age range of our patients goes into adulthood.  Our typical patient is 10-16 years old and a child who has experienced failed efforts to end the bedwetting similar to those suggested by Dr. Sears.

Dr. Sears’ suggestions reveal his lack of basic knowledge regarding the disorder. In our 42 years of treating bedwetting our expert staff has never encountered a bedwetter who could accomplish what Dr. Sears suggests.

 

Source: Lyle Danuloff, Ph.D.
Dr. Danuloff is a Fully Licensed Clinical Psychologist and has been in practice since the early 1970′s. He has been on staff with the Enuresis Treatment Center for Bedwetting since 1984. Dr. Danuloff has intimate clinical knowledge of a bedwetter’s emotional and psychological challenges. Additionally, he participates in our staff development progress, and consults on a regular basis.

 

Here is the original article to which Dr. Danuloff is referencing:

Battling bed-wetting

Author Link By Dr. Bill Sears

Tips to keep young children waking up to dry mornings.

During my 50 years as a doctor, I have helped many little bed wetters enjoy dry nights. It’s physiologically more accurate to call this nighttime nuisance “sleep wetting.” Commonly misunderstood as a psychological or discipline problem, bed-wetting is really more of a sleep quirk. Some kids, more commonly boys, sleep too soundly to respond to their bladder’s get-up-and-go signals. Just as there are normal late walkers and late talkers, there are normal late dry-nighters.
In my pediatric practice and in my own family, I have used five specific steps to conquer bed-wetting:

  1. Draw a picture
    I draw a picture of the brain with “wires” connected to the bladder, explaining to the child, “Your bladder is like a balloon the size of a baseball. Inside the balloon are tiny sensors that tell you when your bladder is full. The full bladder then sends messages to your brain, and the brain tells you to get up and go pee. Because you sleep so deeply, the brain says, ‘Don’t bother me. I don’t respond to text messages while I’m sleeping.’ But your bladder becomes so full it needs to empty, so you pee in your bed. We’re going to help your brain and your bladder listen to each other at night.”
  2. Go before bed
    You are your child’s bladder-training coach. Many bed wetters go to sleep with a half-full bladder because they are tired or in a hurry and only dribble a bit when they go to the bathroom before going to bed. Show and tell your child to “grunt it out” — squeeze all the pee out of your bladder and grunt, grunt, grunt three times so you go to bed with an empty bladder — as you use your hand to show him how the bladder squeezes all the urine out.
  3. Enjoy a talk before bed
    As your child is dozing off to sleep, repeat phrases to program his brain: “I will get up and go to the bathroom when I feel my bladder get big. I will splash water on my face to wake up and grunt three times.” This bedtime rehearsal imprints on your child’s brain and helps his bladder and brain cooperate at night. Alternately, since most children wet the bed within a few hours after retiring, set an alarm to go off a few hours later to prompt him to get up and go.
  4. Wake and relieve
    Before you go to bed, fully awaken your child, help him walk to the bathroom and prompt “grunt three times” to completely empty his bladder. Then escort the sleepy child back to bed.
  5. Go high-tech
    While the above measures usually work 90 percent of the time, if your child is becoming increasingly wet and bothered, try a pad-and-buzzer apparatus called a bladder-conditioning device (available online or in the of office of your health care provider). When a drop of urine strikes the moisture-sensitive pad, it sets off a buzzer that’s attached to the child’s T-shirt or pajama top. Explain this conditioned response to your child as the “beat the buzzer” game. Encourage him to get up and go to the bathroom before the buzzer sounds.

This technique can be effective 90 percent of the time if used correctly. For best results: Have your child empty his bladder completely with the triple voiding technique just before going to bed.

Explain to him that the buzzer will help his bladder and brain listen to each other at night while he’s sleeping. Tell him what to expect: “Imagine waking up and taking a trip to the toilet. Pretend your bladder is full and starting to stretch and it’s time to get up.”

Source: http://healthylivingmadesimple.com/battling-bed-wetting/

Outgrow Bedwetting – When Do They Outgrow It?

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My son is 8 and wets the bed a few times each week. We have tried a variety of things to help prevent it from happening, including stopping beverages two hours before bedtime and using a mattress pad with a bed-wetting alarm. Should we take him to see a specialist? Don’t kids usually outgrow bed-wetting by this age?

Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Patricio Gargollo’s response (see below) of an 8 year-old who wets the bed was helpful but at the same time contains important inaccuracies that we wish to correct.

Dr Gargollo is correct when she states that bedwetting is not a medical problem and that there is no need for medical involvement to deal with it.  

  1. However, she is incorrect when she writes that, “most children outgrow bedwetting when they reach adolescence”.  While some do, many do not.  Bedwetting can continue well into adulthood or never spontaneously end.  We have worked with thousands of individuals who continued to experience bedwetting, never achieving the dry bed.
  1. Allowing a child a child to “outgrow” the problem may sound comforting and benign.  However, Dr Gargollo fails to consider the massive psychological distress and possible life long psychological consequences that can impact a child the longer he/she suffers with the disorder.

Her mentioning of the possible anxiety a bedwetter might experience speaks to her lack of appreciation about the stress the disorder can cause.

While it is true that bedwetting is not a life threatening disorder, if untreated it creates venerability to shame, low self esteem, feeling “different” feeling failure and a profound fear of discovery.  Someone who wets the bed always wonder why he or she fail at something that “everybody else can do”.

Children who wet the bed live in fear of sleepovers, overnight camp or any circumstance where their problem is open to discovery by their peers.  In our experience, we have encountered horror stories regarding merciless teasing, harassment and rejection of bedwetters by their peers.

Very importantly, a large percentage of child who experience bedwetting suffer from daytime control problems that intensifies their terror about discovery and their sense of shame.

So, “waiting to outgrow it” sounds simple and benign.  It isn’t!  Parental support by comforting the child helps but cannot keep the child safe from bedwetting threats to his/her psychological well being.

Dr. Gargollo is correct when she writes that, “bedwetting tends to be more common in children who are heavy sleepers”.

  1. However, she is only partially correct.  In our 42 years of treating bedwetting for children and teenagers, we know that in 98% of the time, the real bedwetting cause is because of a deep sleep disorder that disrupts the brain bladder connection that the doctor mentioned.  We use the following mantra: “all deep sleepers are not bedwetters but all bedwetters are deep sleepers.”

The deep sleep/bedwetting connection was discovered in 1969 by Dr. Roger Broughton at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.  His ground-breaking research confirms that deep sleep, while necessary in the healthy sleep cycle, occurs much more often than it should for someone who experiences bedwetting. The sleep is so deep, sound, heavy that it fails to automatically direct the bladder muscle to remain closed when it receives the bladder’s signal to empty.  It simply cannot be sufficiently aroused by the bladder’s signal and therefore it fails to do its job.

The deep sleep/bedwetting connection is not anecdotal.  We have seen it in almost virtually all of our successfully treated patients over the past forty years.  Our findings have been confirmed by articles published in well-regarded journals of pediatric medicine.

In addition, the deep sleep disorder that causes bed wetting is almost always inherited.  The thousands of history’s we have taken reveal chronic bedwetting history always contains a blood relative who has experienced enuresis.  

Dr. Gargollo is correct when she states “there is nothing the child can or cannot do to prevent bed wetting and you should never punish a child when it happens”.  Children and teenager never “want” to wet the bed, nor are they too lazy to stop it.  They simply cannot control the faulty deep sleep/bladder connection.  They suffer because of this.

  1. The doctor is quite incorrect when she writes, “limiting liquids before bedtime and using a bedwetting alarm may help and are reasonable steps to take”.
  2. She is also incorrect when she writes, “it often takes two weeks to see any response and up to 12 weeks to enjoy completely dry nights”.

If this were true, enuresis would be eradicated and withholding fluids before bedtime and using bed wetting alarms would be the same cure for bedwetting as Dr. Salk’s vaccine is for polio.

Bed wetting alarms alone do not awaken the child from this profoundly deep, heavy, sound sleep. The arousal disorder that is the cause of bedwetting will not allow a bedwetting alarm alone to fully awaken the child and will not end the problem.  

So many of our children’s parents report that their child could sleep through vacuuming, a severe thunderstorm or a very loud voice urging them to wake up.  School mornings can be fraught with frustration.

Dr. Gargollo is correct when she writes that “medications are available that can slow nighttime urine production, calm the bladder or change a child’s sleeping and waking pattern”.  She is even more correct when she writes, “these medications do not cure bedwetting.  When a child stops taking them, the bedwetting typically comes back”.

  1. She fails to mention that these medications can have serious side effects that can compromise overall biological functioning.  We have thousands of cases we have confirmed that bedwetting is not the result of too much urine production or an overactive bladder.

We have devoted 42 years putting a stop to bedwetting and have seen many so called bedwetting solutions come and go.  A vast majority of our patients have experienced deep disappointment at the hands of these bedwetting solutions before reaching out to a real bedwetting expert.

Source: https://www.nobedwetting.com

Dr. Patricio Gargollo answer to the above question

ANSWER: bedwetting is common in children your son’s age, especially boys. Most of those children outgrow bed-wetting without any medical care by the time they reach adolescence. If he’s not having any other urinary associated problems, such as accidents during the day or urinary tract infections, it’s not necessary to take your son to see a doctor. If you notice other medical problems that could be connected to the bed-wetting, however, then an appointment with your son’s primary health care provider would be a good idea.

Toilet training is a complicated process. The sequence of events that must happen in both the brain and the bladder, and the connection between the two, for a child’s body to regulate bladder function effectively during the day and at night can take several years.

Many children have no trouble staying dry during the day and yet have persistent nighttime wetting. It’s not clear why some children have problems with bladder control at night, while others do not. But bed wetting tends to be more common in children who are heavy sleepers.

There is nothing a child can or cannot do to prevent bed-wetting, and you should never punish a child when it happens. The techniques you’re using to try to curb bed-wetting — limiting liquids before bedtime and using a bed-wetting alarm — may help and are reasonable steps to take. Just be patient as you work with your son, and try not to become discouraged if the problem doesn’t stop. It usually takes time. For example, with a bed-wetting alarm, it often takes at least two weeks to see any response and up to 12 weeks to enjoy completely dry nights.

If you notice any of the following symptoms, contact your son’s health care provider: unusual straining during urination, a small or narrow stream of urine, dribbling after urination, cloudy or pink urine, bloodstains on underpants or nightclothes, redness or a rash in the genital area, or daytime as well as nighttime wetting. Also, talk to his health care provider if your son is having pain or a burning sensation when he urinates. These symptoms could signal a urinary tract infection, or a bladder or kidney problem. In some cases, accidents during the day as well as at night may be an early sign diabetes, although that is uncommon.

If your son hides wet underwear or bedding to conceal wetting, or if he seems particularly stressed about it, talk to his health care provider about ways you may be able to help your son feel less anxious about bed-wetting.

Rarely, prescription medication may be used to control bed-wetting. Medications are available that can slow nighttime urine production, calm the bladder or change a child’s sleeping and waking pattern. These medications do not cure bed-wetting. When a child stops taking them, the bed-wetting typically comes back.

Keep in mind that most children eventually outgrown bed-wetting. Often, all that is needed is time, support, understanding and patience. — Dr. Patricio Gargollo, Pediatric Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

Also read: Light at the end of the tunnel

Providing a Fail Safe Bedwetting Solution

Last night we had a consultation with a family from Iowa.  As bedwetting experts for 41 years, we hear from families often who feel they have tried many bedwetting solution and are at their wit’s end, and this family was no exception. 

They felt they have been through the “ringer” to held their 13 year old stop wetting the bed!  They felt they tried every suggestion which seemed to be bedwetting solutions, which included:

  • Restricting fluids
  • Dietary changes
  • Acupuncture
  • Chiropractic care
  • Shaming tactics
  • Rewards and praise
  • Homeopathic remedies
  • Prescription medication
  • Consultations with urologists
  • Two alarm devices purchased online
  • Awakening in the night for a trip to the bathroom

Their pediatrician told them all their attempts were in vain because by puberty, the bedwetting can be expected to end.  Sadly, that is not statistically accurate.  It also creates a “wait and see” frame of mind rather than a workable plan to succeed.

Parents as well as teen’s that continue to wet the bed want a solution… not suggestions. (see also Light at the end of the tunnel)

Bedwetting is the result of an inherited gene.  The time we spend assessing all aspects of the deep sleep disorder–which causes bedwetting as well as many other symptoms–provides us with a great deal of information.  The family history was full of sleep difficulties, which is why this is critical to explore.

For this family, the dad has sleep apnea and insomnia.  When he gasps for air, it awakens him, and then he has trouble falling back to sleep.  He has grown accustomed to having four or five hours of sleep per night!

The mother of this boy has a sister who outgrew bedwetting at age 10.  Yet we, as experts, know that although her bedwetting ceased, the sleep disorder—again, the causal factor of the bedwetting—still existed.  When this mom recently spent the night at her sister’s house, she was stunned by what she observed.  Her sister lives on a busy street, and it’s typical for trucks and ambulances to pass by her home.  Yet the sister did not “move a muscle” when these loud noises occurred.  She was asked about it the next day, and she replied, “I never hear anything.  I sleep like a rock, you know, so I won’t hear a thing in the night.  You’d think that would be a good thing, but I’m always tired in the morning”!  So you can see that even if you outgrow bedwetting, you don’t outgrow the sleep disorder, and that remains a problem throughout one’s life.

For some, this disorder can produce apnea, sleepwalking, night terrors, excessive snoring, teeth grinding, insomnia, etc. 

It can also skip generations, but it’s there.  If there’s any of the above anywhere in the lineage, the gene has been passed on.   

So for this young man, both of his parents show signs of the sleep disorder in the lineage.  We know this leads to a longer history of bedwetting, as well as increased symptoms from the sleep disorder.

Unfortunately, the family’s persistence for a bedwetting solution did not produce results – a dry bed.  They deserve peace of mind, especially when their son goes on a school trip to Washington D.C

At the completion of our consultation, this young man said he was so excited to get started because he felt like “God rained down a miracle upon me”!  He said no one ever took the time to explain why he was wetting the bed and how to fix it.  He felt like this had been his fault, and he felt relief.

His parents were also relieved that we would be providing a personalized, organized plan…a solution that targets everything needed for this 13 year old.  No guesswork – No drugs – No star charts – No psychological exploration. 

We bring four decades of experience as well as a solid process that will put an end to bedwetting regardless of the age. 

GaileGaile Nixon,
International Director and First Patient of ETC