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Outgrow Bedwetting – When Do They Outgrow It?

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: My son is 8 and wets the bed a few times each week. We have tried a variety of things to help prevent it from happening, including stopping beverages two hours before bedtime and using a mattress pad with a bed-wetting alarm. Should we take him to see a specialist? Don’t kids usually outgrow bed-wetting by this age?

Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Patricio Gargollo’s response (see below) of an 8 year-old who wets the bed was helpful but at the same time contains important inaccuracies that we wish to correct.

Dr Gargollo is correct when she states that bedwetting is not a medical problem and that there is no need for medical involvement to deal with it.  

  1. However, she is incorrect when she writes that, “most children outgrow bedwetting when they reach adolescence”.  While some do, many do not.  Bedwetting can continue well into adulthood or never spontaneously end.  We have worked with thousands of individuals who continued to experience bedwetting, never achieving the dry bed.
  1. Allowing a child a child to “outgrow” the problem may sound comforting and benign.  However, Dr Gargollo fails to consider the massive psychological distress and possible life long psychological consequences that can impact a child the longer he/she suffers with the disorder.

Her mentioning of the possible anxiety a bedwetter might experience speaks to her lack of appreciation about the stress the disorder can cause.

While it is true that bedwetting is not a life threatening disorder, if untreated it creates venerability to shame, low self esteem, feeling “different” feeling failure and a profound fear of discovery.  Someone who wets the bed always wonder why he or she fail at something that “everybody else can do”.

Children who wet the bed live in fear of sleepovers, overnight camp or any circumstance where their problem is open to discovery by their peers.  In our experience, we have encountered horror stories regarding merciless teasing, harassment and rejection of bedwetters by their peers.

Very importantly, a large percentage of child who experience bedwetting suffer from daytime control problems that intensifies their terror about discovery and their sense of shame.

So, “waiting to outgrow it” sounds simple and benign.  It isn’t!  Parental support by comforting the child helps but cannot keep the child safe from bedwetting threats to his/her psychological well being.

Dr. Gargollo is correct when she writes that, “bedwetting tends to be more common in children who are heavy sleepers”.

  1. However, she is only partially correct.  In our 42 years of treating bedwetting for children and teenagers, we know that in 98% of the time, the real bedwetting cause is because of a deep sleep disorder that disrupts the brain bladder connection that the doctor mentioned.  We use the following mantra: “all deep sleepers are not bedwetters but all bedwetters are deep sleepers.”

The deep sleep/bedwetting connection was discovered in 1969 by Dr. Roger Broughton at McGill University in Montreal, Canada.  His ground-breaking research confirms that deep sleep, while necessary in the healthy sleep cycle, occurs much more often than it should for someone who experiences bedwetting. The sleep is so deep, sound, heavy that it fails to automatically direct the bladder muscle to remain closed when it receives the bladder’s signal to empty.  It simply cannot be sufficiently aroused by the bladder’s signal and therefore it fails to do its job.

The deep sleep/bedwetting connection is not anecdotal.  We have seen it in almost virtually all of our successfully treated patients over the past forty years.  Our findings have been confirmed by articles published in well-regarded journals of pediatric medicine.

In addition, the deep sleep disorder that causes bed wetting is almost always inherited.  The thousands of history’s we have taken reveal chronic bedwetting history always contains a blood relative who has experienced enuresis.  

Dr. Gargollo is correct when she states “there is nothing the child can or cannot do to prevent bed wetting and you should never punish a child when it happens”.  Children and teenager never “want” to wet the bed, nor are they too lazy to stop it.  They simply cannot control the faulty deep sleep/bladder connection.  They suffer because of this.

  1. The doctor is quite incorrect when she writes, “limiting liquids before bedtime and using a bedwetting alarm may help and are reasonable steps to take”.
  2. She is also incorrect when she writes, “it often takes two weeks to see any response and up to 12 weeks to enjoy completely dry nights”.

If this were true, enuresis would be eradicated and withholding fluids before bedtime and using bed wetting alarms would be the same cure for bedwetting as Dr. Salk’s vaccine is for polio.

Bed wetting alarms alone do not awaken the child from this profoundly deep, heavy, sound sleep. The arousal disorder that is the cause of bedwetting will not allow a bedwetting alarm alone to fully awaken the child and will not end the problem.  

So many of our children’s parents report that their child could sleep through vacuuming, a severe thunderstorm or a very loud voice urging them to wake up.  School mornings can be fraught with frustration.

Dr. Gargollo is correct when she writes that “medications are available that can slow nighttime urine production, calm the bladder or change a child’s sleeping and waking pattern”.  She is even more correct when she writes, “these medications do not cure bedwetting.  When a child stops taking them, the bedwetting typically comes back”.

  1. She fails to mention that these medications can have serious side effects that can compromise overall biological functioning.  We have thousands of cases we have confirmed that bedwetting is not the result of too much urine production or an overactive bladder.

We have devoted 42 years putting a stop to bedwetting and have seen many so called bedwetting solutions come and go.  A vast majority of our patients have experienced deep disappointment at the hands of these bedwetting solutions before reaching out to a real bedwetting expert.

Source: https://www.nobedwetting.com

Dr. Patricio Gargollo answer to the above question

ANSWER: bedwetting is common in children your son’s age, especially boys. Most of those children outgrow bed-wetting without any medical care by the time they reach adolescence. If he’s not having any other urinary associated problems, such as accidents during the day or urinary tract infections, it’s not necessary to take your son to see a doctor. If you notice other medical problems that could be connected to the bed-wetting, however, then an appointment with your son’s primary health care provider would be a good idea.

Toilet training is a complicated process. The sequence of events that must happen in both the brain and the bladder, and the connection between the two, for a child’s body to regulate bladder function effectively during the day and at night can take several years.

Many children have no trouble staying dry during the day and yet have persistent nighttime wetting. It’s not clear why some children have problems with bladder control at night, while others do not. But bed wetting tends to be more common in children who are heavy sleepers.

There is nothing a child can or cannot do to prevent bed-wetting, and you should never punish a child when it happens. The techniques you’re using to try to curb bed-wetting — limiting liquids before bedtime and using a bed-wetting alarm — may help and are reasonable steps to take. Just be patient as you work with your son, and try not to become discouraged if the problem doesn’t stop. It usually takes time. For example, with a bed-wetting alarm, it often takes at least two weeks to see any response and up to 12 weeks to enjoy completely dry nights.

If you notice any of the following symptoms, contact your son’s health care provider: unusual straining during urination, a small or narrow stream of urine, dribbling after urination, cloudy or pink urine, bloodstains on underpants or nightclothes, redness or a rash in the genital area, or daytime as well as nighttime wetting. Also, talk to his health care provider if your son is having pain or a burning sensation when he urinates. These symptoms could signal a urinary tract infection, or a bladder or kidney problem. In some cases, accidents during the day as well as at night may be an early sign diabetes, although that is uncommon.

If your son hides wet underwear or bedding to conceal wetting, or if he seems particularly stressed about it, talk to his health care provider about ways you may be able to help your son feel less anxious about bed-wetting.

Rarely, prescription medication may be used to control bed-wetting. Medications are available that can slow nighttime urine production, calm the bladder or change a child’s sleeping and waking pattern. These medications do not cure bed-wetting. When a child stops taking them, the bed-wetting typically comes back.

Keep in mind that most children eventually outgrown bed-wetting. Often, all that is needed is time, support, understanding and patience. — Dr. Patricio Gargollo, Pediatric Urology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

Also read: Light at the end of the tunnel

Providing a Fail Safe Bedwetting Solution

Last night we had a consultation with a family from Iowa.  As bedwetting experts for 41 years, we hear from families often who feel they have tried many bedwetting solution and are at their wit’s end, and this family was no exception. 

They felt they have been through the “ringer” to held their 13 year old stop wetting the bed!  They felt they tried every suggestion which seemed to be bedwetting solutions, which included:

  • Restricting fluids
  • Dietary changes
  • Acupuncture
  • Chiropractic care
  • Shaming tactics
  • Rewards and praise
  • Homeopathic remedies
  • Prescription medication
  • Consultations with urologists
  • Two alarm devices purchased online
  • Awakening in the night for a trip to the bathroom

Their pediatrician told them all their attempts were in vain because by puberty, the bedwetting can be expected to end.  Sadly, that is not statistically accurate.  It also creates a “wait and see” frame of mind rather than a workable plan to succeed.

Parents as well as teen’s that continue to wet the bed want a solution… not suggestions. (see also Light at the end of the tunnel)

Bedwetting is the result of an inherited gene.  The time we spend assessing all aspects of the deep sleep disorder–which causes bedwetting as well as many other symptoms–provides us with a great deal of information.  The family history was full of sleep difficulties, which is why this is critical to explore.

For this family, the dad has sleep apnea and insomnia.  When he gasps for air, it awakens him, and then he has trouble falling back to sleep.  He has grown accustomed to having four or five hours of sleep per night!

The mother of this boy has a sister who outgrew bedwetting at age 10.  Yet we, as experts, know that although her bedwetting ceased, the sleep disorder—again, the causal factor of the bedwetting—still existed.  When this mom recently spent the night at her sister’s house, she was stunned by what she observed.  Her sister lives on a busy street, and it’s typical for trucks and ambulances to pass by her home.  Yet the sister did not “move a muscle” when these loud noises occurred.  She was asked about it the next day, and she replied, “I never hear anything.  I sleep like a rock, you know, so I won’t hear a thing in the night.  You’d think that would be a good thing, but I’m always tired in the morning”!  So you can see that even if you outgrow bedwetting, you don’t outgrow the sleep disorder, and that remains a problem throughout one’s life.

For some, this disorder can produce apnea, sleepwalking, night terrors, excessive snoring, teeth grinding, insomnia, etc. 

It can also skip generations, but it’s there.  If there’s any of the above anywhere in the lineage, the gene has been passed on.   

So for this young man, both of his parents show signs of the sleep disorder in the lineage.  We know this leads to a longer history of bedwetting, as well as increased symptoms from the sleep disorder.

Unfortunately, the family’s persistence for a bedwetting solution did not produce results – a dry bed.  They deserve peace of mind, especially when their son goes on a school trip to Washington D.C

At the completion of our consultation, this young man said he was so excited to get started because he felt like “God rained down a miracle upon me”!  He said no one ever took the time to explain why he was wetting the bed and how to fix it.  He felt like this had been his fault, and he felt relief.

His parents were also relieved that we would be providing a personalized, organized plan…a solution that targets everything needed for this 13 year old.  No guesswork – No drugs – No star charts – No psychological exploration. 

We bring four decades of experience as well as a solid process that will put an end to bedwetting regardless of the age. 

GaileGaile Nixon,
International Director and First Patient of ETC

Light at the end of the tunnel

We recently had a consultation with a family from Indonesia.  Their six year old son is a bedwetter.  This family shared that they were anxious about the issue of bedwetting since it was not something that people in their community ever discussed.  We explained the same is true no matter where you live.  Bedwetting is a very common issue—just not commonly discussed. 

Even though their child was only six and they hadn’t tried multiple things to end his bedwetting, they didn’t feel that anything being offered made sense, so they were growing more anxious.  They didn’t like the idea of medication, they didn’t see how restricting fluids would be useful; they didn’t want to awaken their child randomly in the night.  They read on blogs that constipation might be the cause of the bedwetting, or that maybe the food they fed their son was creating allergies that triggered bedwetting.  They knew in their gut that none of these were accurate assessments or suggestions.

So now they felt both anxious….and baffled.

When these parents began to hear about how we treat bedwetting from its root cause—the source issue—they began to make sense of it all.  For the first time, the pieces of the puzzle fell into place.  And then they said these exact words:  “This is brilliant.  We can actually see a light at the end of the tunnel before we even start”!  YAYYYY!

We so wish to fill every family with this kind of relief, excitement and possibility!  Everyone deserves to have this experience, because bedwetting can and will be treated!  Nobody has to live with this depressing, frustrating, misunderstood issue.   Call us and find out how!

Also read: Dad and daughter thrilled with bedwetting program

GaileGaile Nixon,
International Director and First Patient of ETC

Scientists discuss deep sleep and treatment for bedwetting

Interview with two scientists discussing deep sleep, the bedwetting problem and bedwetting program and treatment for bedwetting.

Erica: First let me just say, the wetting has been part of our lives — he wet basically every single day of his life. It wasn’t just an occasional thing. So it was a real problem, and It became clear he wasn’t outgrowing it. We had tried some behavior therapy, we had tried an alarm, and it didn’t wake him up sufficiently. It was getting really frustrating.

We talked to our pediatrician who said the alarm is the best thing. One time when he went away to camp, he used some medication, which actually didn’t even work that well. We were never planning on that as a long term thing. It was just to try so he could go to camp.

Barbara: Excellent.

Erica: We really were frustrated, and I came across your website during some of my investigations. Quite frankly, my husband and I are both researchers. We’re scientists. I was struck by this information on the sleep cycle that you had in your description of the problem. That caught my eye for a couple reasons. One was this disruption of REM sleep that was discussed. Jerry never remembered having dreams, and I always thought that was really strange, and so that resonated as true with our experience.

Then I went back to the actual scientific article that you cited there, and read some of the research. This paper in Science, which is one of the premier scientific journals—we know it has hard criteria to get in. So that was the original paper that was cited. I was actually really surprised that not many people had done anything with this.

I was really struck by your story about finding this information about the sleep cycle, and following it up to help your daughter. But I filed the information away for awhile, and still things weren’t going very well with Jerry. We finally decided —he was 9 and a half, almost 10, and we said we have to do something about this. I was a little concerned that it was, you know remote—we are in CA and you guys are in MI, but I decided to have a phone interview.

Gaile is who we spoke to for the first time, and she was great. It sounded really —I was impressed by what appeared to be the comprehensiveness of the program. It was working to address the sleeping problem, which is the core of bedwetting problems, I now understand.

Jerry: Which is somewhat counter­intuitive and not well-known, I should say. Most people don’t think of it as a sleep disorder or problem.

Barbara: Exactly. They know the child sleeps deeply, but they don’t connect it to being the cause of the bedwetting.

Erica: Right, but we knew something was up with Jerry. Number one, the dreaming thing I always thought was very odd. And then the alarm thing…we bought one of the more expensive alarms, but he didn’t wake up. The pediatrician suggested we get the kind that a hand comes up and slaps you in the face. (laughter).

This notion of being in a deep deep sleep never came up, but it kind of rang true for us. Deep sleep bedwetting is what our son was experiencing.  Seeing that this scientific study on the EEG pattern to corroborate that convinced me at least that there was a sound basis behind your approach. I was impressed with what Gaile told us about the various elements of your bedwetting program, and we set up our first appointment. We just decided we needed to try something.

The way the program worked with the private phone meetings every two weeks, the forms, and the help available whenever we needed it. Even though there were several stages involved, and as long as everybody’s committed to making it work, it’s a very comprehensive program, and it’s not that hard to follow. I think you guys make it easy to keep track.

Barbara: It’s a complicated bedwetting problem, but without our guidance and education, it would be enormously difficult.  You said you failed to stop bed wetting for your son.

Jerry: That’s what I’m impressed with, actually, is the kind of systematic way you approach this. From sleep, bladder, muscle control; from a brain perspective. You’re really hitting all parts of the body. By the way, one thing that Erica and I agree on—I’m sure you guys are doing this— but most of the pediatricians we’ve talked to have never heard of this, and they really need to know about your bedwetting program.

Erica: That’s where people go to with this…they talk to their pediatrician.

Jerry: Our pediatrician was telling us he should take the medicine.

Erica: No, she wasn’t. She mentioned a bedwetting alarm. She said he could take medicine, but that it will come back as soon as he stops it. So she wasn’t advocating drugs. But we gave her information about your enuresis program, and I have a friend who is a medical social worker who specializes in pediatrics. I was telling her about this and gave her the deep sleep bedwetting information about your program so she can tell her clients. This really needs to be disseminated to the people who are dealing with the care of children.

Barbara: You can certainly appreciate our uphill battle for 41 years. We’ve tried in every way to educate the professionals, particularly pediatricians. Of course we all go to our pediatrician first, but they just sort of dismiss it. They don’t really understand it. It doesn’t mean they aren’t good doctors, it just means they don’t understand bedwetting. So typically, they give the worst advice.

Erica: After I first encountered your program and the paper in Science that you originally cited, I then went to look to see who is doing research on enuresis and children. There is hardly anybody in the United States doing anything. In fact, there is a big group in the Netherlands doing stuff. They have some papers where they cited the original paper you cited as well. One issue might be just that this is not an area of research in this country, apparently.

Barbara: Again, because no one understands the real impact. They don’t understand the sleep disorder and how that effects the child physically, emotionally, and psychologically. Again, in every country we work with families—like Australia, France, Russia, Mexico—all doctors say the same thing. They give the worst advice: Don’t worry about the bedwetting problem..they’ll outgrow it. Then they say to restrict fluids, take them to the bathroom in the night, punitive measures; reward them.

And to reward for something or to scold for anything that is out of their control simply isn’t fair. Then they’ll offer to try an alarm. And then oh my goodness…we had a family in California with a 19 year old—you can appreciate— her son slept through two earthquakes. These children don’t hear bed wetting alarms. They don’t even hear smoke alarms, and that’s disconcerting.

Erica: My social worker friend knows mothers with young children. There will be three or four people whom she knows who have kids with bedwetting problems, and she has referred them to me, and then I refer them to you. The other thing that is really important for anybody who is considering the program is listening to what we’re talking about right now is that because we come from a scientific background, we tend to be quite skeptical. We don’t buy the ads. I was very skeptical when we saw the 97% success rate, like how can that possibly be.

Greg: And the money­-back guarantee.

Erica: But here we are. We were worried that Jerry would have a lifelong problem. But as soon as we started going with your bedwetting program and seeing what it did and pulling out all the stops and making all the connections between the bladder and the brain—working with the sleep disturbance, working with the bladder capacity, working on the sphincter—all these things to try to take every angle on the problem, we were very, very impressed. It wasn’t a matter of belief, sounds cool”—it was working. Before you even get to the endpoint, you can see how it was working.

Barbara: Many people do have a lifelong problem with bedwetting.

Erica: Yes, I know you treat adults, too.

Barbara: Yes, and currently, our oldest patient is 44. And the older one gets, the more challenges they encounter, which can include social isolation and leading very solitary lives because they would rather be alone than have to share or speak about this to anyone. All around the world, bedwetting and its challenges has such a high impact on everyone. It is a shame that the professionals don’t understand.

Let’s speak a little bit about Jerry and how this has changed his life.

Greg: Fortunately, we never made a big deal about it. We were very careful not to be putative all along, so he’s never developed a real problem about it. But it was quite clear that he felt ashamed or guilty or whatever…pretty typical stuff. He clearly didn’t want his friends knowing about it. I used to have a bedwetting problem for awhile—and I still have issues with sleep—and I remember that feeling. But then all of a sudden, he would sleep over at someone’s house and not pee, and that was great when he completed your treatment and he was was able to stay dry and not have to worry about it.

Erica: What we used to do, he would do sleepovers, and then he even went to camp once before we were in your bedwetting program, and he would take a Pull­Up and would be discreet; put it away in a plastic bag. He was actually pretty well ­adjusted around it. He didn’t seem to feel stigmatized. But it was this thing that he always had to take care of. We were always crossing our fingers saying, he doesn’t leak”. He would be mortified if they found out. It’s just been so liberating for him—I can tell—not to have to think about it. Like being over at a friend’s house and to be asked last minute, have to worry about going home and getting stuff and having the bag—just that he doesn’t have to worry about it.

Barbara: Just not to have to think about it, even! It’s an “Do you want to sleep over” over­night that he can jump into.

Erica: It’s sooo nice. For me as a parent—he’s a really bright kid, he’s a well-­liked kid, well­-accomplished….I always used to think: Here’s this great kid, and there’s this one thing. It got to the point when I first called you guys that I was feeling like— we’ve got to help him. We’ve tried a number of other things trying to prevent bed wetting, but we thought we’ve got to get him out of this. And it worked.

Barbara: You all handled this enuresis problem very well, too. You understood that his worst fear would be that somebody will find out.

Some people don’t handle it as well as you did in that they scold and blame the child for being lazy, that sort of thing. That’s wonderful for him that you understood. And, of course, Greg, you understood having experienced bedwetting first­hand

Greg: Right. It’s it’s definitely changed ­ not the least of which is that we don’t have to do the wash every day.

Erica: Oh yes, we have a drought here in California. So it suddenly occurred to me—I guess it was by the middle of the spring— i realized “I’m not doing wash every day, Greg!” That was great, too!

Barbara: I remember a story years ago, at the end of treatment, a child was complaining saying, Miss Barbara, my mom and dad only change my sheets once a week now. That’s no fair”. And then you realize that his whole life they had washed sheets every day. He thought that was normal. He hadn’t realized that he’s not in a hotel! (laughter). You realize that that was common for him. And then there was a child that I spoke to who said he had a dream for the first time. It was the first time that he had ever experienced a dream. It was phenomenal for him! He was describing “Oh, I saw this and that, and it was in color”. You realize something so simple like a dream never happens.

Erica: It used to make me feel — this is something I paid attention to with the treatment. I did notice him having dreams more.

I haven’t asked him lately as much. That always was weird to me that he didn’t because he has such a great memory. It suggested to me that he wasn’t having them. It always kind of broke my heart a little bit that he wasn’t experiencing dreaming.

Barbara: Because you know how important that is to brain health and how one functions during the day. Dream sleep is such an important part of getting quality sleep.

Erica: Yes, so I did notice a difference in that. It’s interesting. I haven’t asked about it lately, but I will now.

Barbara: Particularly with your backgrounds, you know how lack of dreaming and how it can cause frustration during the day, or anxiety or moodiness. Sometimes because of the poor quality sleep and lack of dreaming, they are misdiagnosed as having ADD and ADHD.  Almost daily we talk with parents who are dealing with bedwetting and ADHD.

Erica: Fortunately, that was one of the things that he’s never had trouble with. This is also another reason that we would have never thought about a sleep problem with Jerry because he is pretty high energy, and compared to a lot of kids, he doesn’t seem to need a long night’s sleep. He never was drowsy during the day or not focusing or whatever. The main way it came out was with the bedwetting and the lack of dreaming.

Barbara: I’m so happy that we had the opportunity to help him. Those last two months at the end of treatment being totally dry must have been very refreshing for all of you. Erica/

Greg: Oh yes!  How to stop wetting the bed was a topic of conversation routinely.

Barbara: Until you get all of the components — you can try little bits and pieces and get part of the puzzle—but unless you get all of the components, one is not going to be successful with ending bedwetting and changing the pattern of sleep.

Erica: I also think that being a part of the program has a motivational kick to it. Especially with Jerry who didn’t really want to wet the bed, but also seemed to be ok with it, on some superficial level at least. Having the structure—all these things that we were doing— kind of got him fully on board with the process. Don’t you agree, Greg?

Greg: Yes.

Erica: Even though we tried other enuresis approaches, there was no getting away from this one, and I think that helped.

Barbara: With every failure experience, it makes it more and more difficult for a child. I’m glad we were able to help him while he was 10 years old instead of 18 years old and graduating from high school and can’t go away to college.

Greg: That would be a nightmare, yeah.

Barbara: People just sort of give up after awhile and resign themselves to thinking “I may be wetting the bed the rest of my life”.

Erica: Do you do follow­up with people, like a year later or anything like that?

Barbara: Yes, we have an automatic follow­up checking with families to make sure there are no difficulties. And we tell everyone— as I’m sure you were told—that if you ever have any situation in the future where you need our help, you only need to call. No matter if it’s five years or 10 years.

Erica: Lori did tell us that. She was wonderful.

Barbara: She’s a wonderful Treatment Advisor and very caring. Being a nurse, she has the medical background if we need some knowledge, although we’re not doing anything medical. But it’s nice to have all the professional background for the Treatment Advisors like we have to develop individualized bedwetting programs.

Well, thank you very, very much. Our very best to all of you. We appreciate the opportunity to help make a difference and change his life. And of course, it changes the family’s life.

Erica: It does, and we are very, very grateful to you folks, and to you for developing this program. I cannot image adolescent bedwetting.

Barbara: I’ve had my long struggle, also. But it’s nice to be able now to help others. Just as when you spoke with Gaile, she is kind of giving back what was given to her. Her heart and soul is in it, so that makes a difference.

Erica: I really enjoyed talking with her a lot.

Barbara: Good, I appreciate that. Everyone here tries to be as helpful as possible. That’s why we’re here six days a week. If someone needs help, they only need to call.

Erica: Just one last thing about Gaile. I was very impressed with her because I was very skeptical, so I was challenging her with understanding more about your bedwetting program with a bunch of different questions, and this and that, and she was just so non-defensive. It actually really spoke to her confidence in the program. She answered everything clearly. She understood my skepticism. She acknowledged legitimate questions. She offered guidance and pointed me in directions whenever possible. She said she’d get back to me on things, and I was very impressed by that. It played a big role in moving further with it, I think.

Barbara: I thank you very much. By the way, Erica. I was a very challenging mom, also. It think that’s what you have to be, because we are the only advocate for our children. We appreciate what it takes.

Erica: Yes. I’m really glad I pushed forward with this one, I’ll tell you.

Barbara: Thank you again, Greg and Erica! We are so happy for your family!

GaileGaile Nixon,
International Director and First Patient of ETC

Deep Sleep Bedwetting – 16 Year Old Robbed of Childhood

Deep Sleep Bedwetting robs granddaughter of her childhood.

A grandmother recently called our bed wetting clinic regarding her 16 year­-old granddaughter. She shared through her tears that the deep sleep bedwetting has “robbed” her granddaughter of her childhood.

When she visits her grandmother, she sleeps on the floor because she doesn’t want to “ruin another mattress”. She has refused to attend sleepovers because of feeling embarrassed, and over time, her group of friends stopped inviting her.

She refused to spend any time with boys showing interest in her.

She’s always felt she was “different in a bad way” often remarked that all she does is disappoint everyone. This is not uncommon for us to hear. We admit that we are always stunned to hear about this kind of trauma, but we are not surprised by it, either. Bed wetting all by itself— without even discussing the devastating effects of the deep sleep disorder causing it—is burdensome, stressful, frustrating, and deeply impactful to one’s self­-esteem! And our self- esteem helps shape how we relate to others and how we see the world around us.

This grandmother felt heart­broken for her granddaughter for having to experience something that produces sadness or shame or guilt. She told us that if she could end her granddaughter’s bedwetting forever, it would be the gift that keeps on giving for a lifetime.

We’ve been honored and privileged to see miracles happen for thousands of people over the years. 41 years to be exact. I should know… I was the first patient. When my mom ended my deep sleep bedwetting, my whole life opened up and I began to feel good about myself for the first time! And that’s when she decided to bring this program —and the miracles — to the world around us!

We invite you to call us today – 800-379-2331.

GaileGaile Nixon,
International Director and First Patient of ETC