Hard To Live With Secret of Bed Wetting

Paul G. Donohue, M.D.
“Ask the Doctor”
P.O. Box 536475
Orlando, FL 32853-6475

 

Dear Dr. Donohue:

I read your August 20, 2009 column, “Bed-wetting profoundly affects children” with interest.  You explained that bedwetting may result from the brain not responding by rousing the sleeper with a full-bladder; delay in attaining large enough bladder capacity; or too little of the hormone vasopressin.

 

As you note, while a decreasing number of proportion of young people have bed wetting difficulties as they grow from childhood to adolescence and adulthood, some continue to be bed wetters, with very negative effects on self-esteem.  The older a person is, the harder it is to live with the secret of bed-wetter.

 

Based on personal and professional experience, I strongly recommend the Enuresis Treatment Center as a successful, professional program that helps children, teenagers, and adults end bedwetting.  Their bedwetting treatment program focuses on sleep patterns, bladder capacity, and behavioral change.  It works.  The website ishttps://www.nobedwetting.com; toll-free telephone 800-379-2331.  Most of the Center’s counseling is on-line with families all over the world.  The Center is located in Farmington Hills, Michigan in the greater Detroit area; staff members can also meet with local families in person.

I have no financial interest in the Enuresis Treatment Center.  As a professional in behavioral health field and as a mother and grand-mother, I care deeply about promoting positive self-esteem and helping young people reach their full potential.  I hope this information will be help to your readers.

Sincerely,

Jessica Wolf, PH.D.
Assistant Clinical Professor
Yale University School of Medicine
Department of Psychiatry

Cc: Michael Stallsmith, Enuresis Treatment Center

NOTE: signature and actual letter on file

Procedure from Urologist Bizarre

Mom of 11-year-old girl told me about a procedure the Urologist performed on her two years ago claiming it would end the bed wetting. Mom watched  the doctor and have four staff hold her daughter down.  The procedure did nothing to end the bedwetting.  Mom described it as “medical rape”.

For the next two years mom said her daughter literally shut down.

Once she found our center, they both knew it was the best help to end the chronic bedwetter and give the 13 year old her life back.

 


 

Call the Enuresis Treatment Center now and get the help you deserve!
United States:
1-800-379-2331

International (incl. Canada):
1-248-785-1199

Our specialists have treated bed wetting children, teens, parents and adults around the world, regardless of distance.

Enuresis Treatment Center, Inc.
31700 West 13 Mile Road
Suite 208
Farmington Hills, Michigan 48334

Click the link for more information on our Bed Wetting Counseling Services for Children

Pediatrician’s Only Solution: to Stop Bedwetting: Make Teen Do Own Laundry

Texas mother called us and said her Pediatrician had no idea how to help her 13 year old child stop wetting the bed.  The Pediatrician said to “just have him take care of his own laundry from now on, that should be incentive enough to stop wetting the bed”.

 


 

Call the Enuresis Treatment Center now and get the help you deserve!
United States:
1-800-379-2331

International (incl. Canada):
1-248-785-1199

Our specialists have treated bed wetting children, teens, parents and adults around the world, regardless of distance.

Enuresis Treatment Center, Inc.
31700 West 13 Mile Road
Suite 208
Farmington Hills, Michigan 48334

Click the link for more information on our Bed Wetting Counseling Services for Teenagers

Bed Wetting Approach of “Wait and See” Outdated

According to a study posted on the science index website September 26, 2012, childhood nocturnal enuresis (NE) and incontinence has been shown to be associated with increased behavioural problems and reduced self-esteem (SE) in Western populations. The impact on Asian children, however, is not known. This study investigates the relationship between SE and monosymptomatic NE in Malaysian children aged 6 to 16 years.Method:  Children with wetting frequency of at least 4 out of 14 nights were recruited with controls matched for age, gender and race. SE scores were obtained using the ‘I Think I Am’ questionnaire for five domains: body image, talents and skills, psychological well-being, relationship with family and relationship with others.

A total of 126 children were recruited; 22 enuretics aged 6–9 years and their matched controls (Group1) and 41 enuretics aged 10–16 years and their matched controls (Group 2). SE scores were similar between the enuretic and controls in Group 1, whereas in Group 2, enuretics had significantly lower scores (P < 0.05) in ‘body image’, ‘relationship with others’ and total SE scores. This difference was more pronounced among girls, adolescents and those who wet more than 10/14 nights.  The SE of Malaysian children with monosymptomatic NE aged 10 years and above is significantly lower than their peers. This effect is seen particularly among girls, adolescents and those with frequent wetting.

In the light of these findings, the ‘wait and see’ approach by the Malaysian medical profession is no longer appropriate. Treatment should begin before the age of 10 years.

The Enuresis Treatment Center, a bedwetting clinic, has been helping children, teenagers and adults since 1975.  The staff has never taken a wait and see approach to bed wetting problems.  They are very results oriented.  Waiting to outgrow bed wetting is the worse advice a medical professional can give to a child or a teenager.

Their website has a great deal of information regarding bed wetting and the sleep connection.  Deep sleep can produces symptom of nighttime wetting.  Please visit  www.nobedwetting.com

Bedwetting and Bipolar Disorder In Children Another Myth From The Mental Health Community

USA Today, in it’s December 11, 2012 article, “Parents of bipolar kids face hard questions” reports that Dr. Dimitri Papolos, child psychiatrist, reports in his book  The Bipolar Child, that bedwetting is a symptom of bipolar disorder.

 

Dr. Papolos’ inaccurate assertion continues to perpetuate a major myth and misunderstanding about bed wetting, i.e. that it is the result of a psychological or psychiatric disorder.  That myth leads to inappropriate treatments for bed wetting that can damage the child and will fail to end the bed wetting.

 

Overwhelming clinical and research evidence points to bedwetting as an inherited deep sleep disorder that can lead to emotional and psychological symptoms; but is not the result of them.

 

Any mental health provider, child psychologist or child psychiatrist who equates bedwetting with bipolar disorder and treats accordingly is perpetuating this dangerous myth.  Additionally, they are misdiagnosing the bed wetting and dooming the child to further suffering from the disorder.

 

 

Author: Dr. Lyle Danuloff Ph.D. is a clinical psychologist and past President of the Michigan Psychological Association. Dr. Danuloff is an international expert in the field of enuresis. He is a consulting psychologist at The Enuresis Treatment Center, a Bed Wetting Center that treats children, teenagers and adults worldwide. https://www.nobedwetting.com

 

Excerpts from the book The Bipolar Child by Dimitri Papolos, M.D.

Diagnosing early-onset bipolar disorder is not just the responsibility of a doctor, but parents, friends and teachers.

  • Abrupt rapid cycling of mood throughout the day.  The child may be silly, goofy and giddy one moment, and the next, irritable, angry and/or aggressive.
  • Racing thoughts and rapid speech.
  • Periods of unusually elevated self-confidence, possibly with delusions of grandeur, such as believing one can fly.
  • Sleep disturbances (i.e., difficulty in going to sleep, difficulty getting up in the morning, frequent nightmares and terrors, bed-wetting, teeth-grinding).
  • Significant episodes of aggression in response to perceived threats, such as vicious cursing and explosive tantrums that can last for hours (15 minutes is typical for a normal tantrum).
  • Fears of death and dying, separation and abandonment. Perceiving even the most benign stimuli as threatening, even in familiar surroundings.
  • Difficulty in making transitions and handling disappointment, criticism, limit-setting and loss.
  • Extreme sweet cravings. An example:  Child likes candy vs. child eats an entire box of sugar.
  • Auditory hallucinations and delusions, vivid images that involve gore and blood.
  • Unusual display of sexuality for a child’s age group.  Example: A 3-year-old lifting her skirt up in class is one thing, but an 8-year-old doing the same is another. The older child should have learned to control impulses like that.
  • Other signs include poor frustration tolerance and frequent complaints of extreme boredom.

Entire article can be found in USA Today, December 11, 2012